latest news- New strain of bacteria responsible for scarlet fever reaching record high breaking news

Scientists have discovered a new strain of bacteria fuelling an unprecedented rise in cases of scarlet fever, which can also cause sepsis. The childhood disease, which used to kill thousands in Victorian times, has increased in recent years, reaching a 5...

latest news- New strain of bacteria responsible for scarlet fever reaching record high breaking news

Scientists have discovered a new strain of bacteria fuelling an unprecedented rise in cases of scarlet fever, which can also cause sepsis. The childhood disease, which used to kill thousands in Victorian times, has increased in recent years, reaching a 5...

latest news- New strain of bacteria responsible for scarlet fever reaching record high breaking news
30 Kasım 2022 - 21:45

Sondakika haberleri

Scientists have discovered a new strain of bacteria fuelling an unprecedented rise in cases of scarlet fever, which can also cause sepsis. 

The childhood disease, which used to kill thousands in Victorian times, has increased in recent years, reaching a 50-year high in 2016. 

New research by Imperial College London has found that a new strain of streptococcus (Strep A) is behind the trends, and is also linked to the deadly condition sepsis

The research found the strain, called M1 UK which has emerged in England and Wales since 2010, has now become the dominant cause of Strep A infections. 

The study found it produces a particular toxin which may be more likely to cause common throat infections and scarlet fever, which may explain the rise in invasive infections.

And it suggests the strain is specific to the UK, with only rare cases so fare found elsewhere.

The research, published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases, analysed strains up to 2016.

Senior author Professor Shiranee Sriskandan, of the Department of Infectious Disease at Imperial College London, said: "We have seen an unprecedented rise in the number of cases of scarlet fever since 2014.

"But it was only in 2016 there was a rise in the number of serious, invasive cases due to Strep A – which are thankfully very rare – coinciding with the seasonal rise in scarlet fever.