latest news NATO allies set to sign accession protocols for Sweden, Finland breaking news

The 30 NATO allies are set to sign off on the accession protocols for Sweden and Finland on Tuesday, sending the membership bids of the two nations to the...

latest news NATO allies set to sign accession protocols for Sweden, Finland breaking news

The 30 NATO allies are set to sign off on the accession protocols for Sweden and Finland on Tuesday, sending the membership bids of the two nations to the...

latest news NATO allies set to sign accession protocols for Sweden, Finland breaking news
05 Temmuz 2022 - 11:47

Sondakika haberleri

The 30 NATO allies are set to sign off on the accession protocols for Sweden and Finland on Tuesday, sending the membership bids of the two nations to the alliance capitals for legislative approvals.

The move will further increase Russia's strategic isolation in the wake of its invasion of neighboring Ukraine in February and military struggles there since.

The 30 ambassadors and permanent representatives are to formally approve the decisions of last week’s NATO summit when the alliance made the historic decision to invite Russia’s neighbor Finland and Scandinavian partner Sweden to join the military club.

Despite the agreement in the alliance, parliamentary approval in member state Turkey could still pose problems for their final inclusion as members.

Last week, President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan warned that Ankara could still block the process if the two countries fail to fully meet Turkey’s demand to extradite terror suspects with links to terrorist groups.

He said Turkey’s Parliament could refuse to ratify the deal. It is a potent threat since NATO accession must be formally approved by all 30 member states, which gives each a blocking right.

Foreign Minister Mevlüt Çavuşoğlu on Monday echoed similar views and said Sweden and Finland have to comply with the recent memorandum signed with Turkey to be part of NATO.

"If they do not comply, we will not accept them into NATO," he underlined.

Nordic countries' membership applications were held up until the last moment by Turkey, which sought guarantees that the Nordic countries would join Turkey’s fight against PKK-linked terrorists and swiftly extradite suspects. The dispute was resolved by a 10-point memorandum, signed last Tuesday, that appeared to address many of Turkey’s terrorism concerns and lift an arms embargo on Ankara imposed in response to Turkey’s 2019 military operation into Syria.

New countries’ membership applications must be approved by all NATO member states and ratified by the countries’ respective parliaments.

The deal also states that Finland and Sweden will work closely with Turkey on issues related to the exchange of information, extradition and, in general, the fight against terrorism.

After four hours of talks in Madrid last Tuesday, Erdoğan and his Finnish and Swedish counterparts agreed on a series of security measures to allow the two Nordic countries to overcome the Turkish veto.

According to the signed memorandum, Finland and Sweden pledged not to support the PKK/YPG or the Gülenist Terror Group (FETÖ), which orchestrated a 2016 coup attempt and is led by U.S.-based Fetullah Gülen. The signed memorandum did not list any individuals for extradition. Ratification in allied parliaments is likely to take up to a year, but once it is done, Finland and Sweden will be covered by NATO’s Article 5 collective defense clause, putting them under the United States’ protective nuclear umbrella.

Tuesday’s expected signing-off does bring both nations deeper into NATO’s fold already. As close partners, they already attended some meetings that involved issues that immediately affected them. As official invitees, they can attend all meetings of the ambassadors even if they do not yet have any voting rights.

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